Myths & Beliefs
Books and Resources (Paganism, Witchcraft and More)

natural-magics:

This list has been updated over the years and will continued to be updated over time. If you re-post this elsewhere, kindly credit me because it’s taken a long time to compile what I feel are useful resources on the following topics. The very basics are covered in my FAQ.

Last updated: 8/24/2014

Paganism:

  • A Pagan Primer — For Those New to Paganism
  • Paganism: An Introduction to Earth-Centered Religions by River and Joyce Higginbotham
  • Pagan Spirituality: A Guide to Personal Transformation by River and Joyce Higginbotham
  • Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-Worshippers, and Other Pagans in America by Margot Adler
  • Connecting to the Power of Nature by Joe H. Slate
  • Exploring the Pagan Path: Wisdom from the Elders (a collection of articles, essays and general commentary from various pagan authors)
  • ChristoPaganism: An Inclusive Path by River Higginbotham and Joyce Higginbotham
  • Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe by H.R. Ellis Davidson

Wicca:

  • Wicca for the Rest of Us
  • Wicca Resources
  • Wicca for Beginners by Thea Sabin
  • Witchcraft Today by Gerald Gardner 
  • The Meaning of Witchcraft by Gerald Gardner
  • The Spiral Dance by Starhawk (most recent edition only, old editions have inaccurate info that has since been updated)
  • Elements of Ritual: Air, Fire, Water & Earth in the Wiccan Circle by Deborah Lipp
  • Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner and Living Wicca: A Further Guide for the Solitary Practitioner (Scott Cunningham)

Witchcraft (non-Wiccan):

  • The Element Encyclopedia of Witchcraft by Judika Illes
  • Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells by Judika Illes
  • Crone’s Book of Charms & Spells by Valerie Worth
  • Witchcraft: a History by P.G. Maxwell-Stuart
  • Mrs. B’s Guide to Household Witchery by Kris Bradley
  • Candle Magic for Beginners by Richard Webster
  • Master Book of Candle Burning by Henry Gamache
  • A Grimoire for Modern Cunningfolk by Peter Paddon
  • Traditional Witchcraft: A Cornish Book of Ways by Gemma Gary and Jane Cox
  • Non-Wiccan Witchcraft Reading List
  • Witch of Forest Grove: Sarah Anne Lawless
  • Welcome to Witchcraft - A Post for Beginners

Witchcraft by Type:

Chaos Magic:

World Mythology:

  • www.sacred-texts.com (free archive of online books about religion, mythology, folklore, and the esoteric)
  • Mythology: Myths, Legends and Fantasies by Alice Mills
  • Illustrated Dictionary of Mythology: Heroes, Heroines, Gods, and Goddesses from Around the World by Philip Wilkinson
  • The Oxford Companion to World Mythology by David Leeming
  • World Mythology: The Illustrated Guide by Roy Willis

Hellenic Polytheism and Greek Mythology:

Magic in Ancient Greece:

  • Magic in the Ancient Greek World by Derek Collins
  • Magic, Witchcraft and Ghosts in the Greek and Roman Worlds by Daniel Ogden
  • Arcana Mundi: Magic and the Occult in the Greek and Roman Worlds by Georg Luck
  • The Greek Magical Papyri in Translation (PDF)
  • Magika Hiera: Ancient Greek Magic and Religion
  • Greek Folk Religion by Martin P Nilsson 
  • Curse Tablets and Binding Spells from the Ancient World by John G. Gager
  • Magic in the Ancient World by Fritz Graf
  • Magic and Magicians in the Greco-Roman World by Matthew W. Dickie

Roman Polytheism:

Kemeticism and Ancient Egyptian Mythology:

  • www.egyptianmyths.net
  • Kemeticism by The Twisted Rope
  • The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt by Richard H. Wilkinson
  • Symbol & Magic in Egyptian Art by Richard H. Wilkinson
  • Egyptian Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses, and Traditions of Ancient Egypt by Geraldine Pinch

Celtic Recon and Myth:

Druidry/Druidism:

Asatru, Heathenism and Norse Mythology:

Crystals and Stones:

  • The Encyclopedia of Crystals by Judy Hall
  • The Crystal Bible by Judy Hall
  • Crystal Healing by Judy Hall
  • Rocks & Minerals by Chris Pellant  (identification handbook)
  • Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic by Scott Cunningham
  • Crystal Grids: How and Why They Work by Hibiscus Moon
  • The Book of Crystal Spells by Ember Grant

Herbal (Magical, Medicinal):

Notes: please take care before using herbs for medicinal and/or supplemental purposes. Many herbs are toxic (some authors fail to mention this!) and/or have harmful side-effects. Always do research and consult a professional before use. 

Fae and Faerie Faith:

Runes:

  • Futhark: A Handbook of Rune Magic by Edred Thorsson
  • Runelore: A Handbook of Esoteric Runology by Edred Thorsson
  • The Complete Illustrated Guide to the Runes by Nigel Pennick

Authors to avoid (due to misinformation, historical inaccuracies, poor research, and/or failure to cite sources):

  • Silver Ravenwolf
  • DJ Conway
  • Edain McCoy
  • Ann Moura 
  • Ralph Blum (runes)
  • approach Llewellyn-published books with caution — there are some great ones, but many aren’t well researched and may contain misinformation.
  • if all else fails, Google the author and ask around to see what people have to say about them - many bad authors have entire pages or discussions dedicated on why to avoid them!
  • always fact check information (especially if it involves ingesting anything or putting anything on the skin — just because an ingredient is natural does not mean it isn’t harmful/toxic)
  • How do I know what to believe? Critical Thinking and Pagan Books
Dragon’s Bite (Warfare Powder)

honeycoyote:

For the strength and bone crushing bite of a dragon. 

Powder that can be used as empowerment for both defensive and offensive spells, could also be used in curses.

 Supplies needed:

  • 5 parts Black Salt
  • 3 parts Chili Powder
  • 1/2 part Dragon’s Blood
  • 1 part Clove
  • 2 parts Thorns
  • 1 part Cinnamon
  • 1 part Mandrake Root
  • optional small bones or bone shards  
  • mortar and pestle
  • jar for storing 

Once you assemble all your ingredients, mix them together in your mortar and pestle. While doing this, focus and feel their energies, pour your power into them while visualizing your magickal intent. Blend and grind the herbs until you feel that they are ready. Once done, add them to a jar and label it. 

Throw Away The Key - A Spell to Banish Grief

witchcraftings:

Purpose: This is a ritual to aid one in ridding oneself of grief of any kind. This is a moving forward spell.

Materials: Five of Cups tarot card (these can be printed off the internet); candles in cheery colours, as many as you wish (I recommend tea candles or very small candles for this spell); an old key you don’t need (I prefer skeleton keys, which one can find in home decor stores); a glass of sweet red wine or any sweet drink; running water, such as a river or creek.

This spell is best done…: On a sunny day. Preferably in autumn. The waning moon. A Saturday. If you can find all these conditions in one day, you’ll be set, but don’t worry; they’re not requirements, just suggestions.

Instructions:

Cast circle and call quarters if desired. Ground and centre if necessary.

Place the Five of Cups in its reversed position (upside-down) on your altar or on a flat surface. Place the candle around it, and light them. Hold the key above the candle flames. In your mind, visualize the key being inserted into a lock on a door. The key turns, and the lock is opened, and so is the door. Say:

"No more sorrow, no more grief
I hold the key to set myself free.”

Sip the wine/drink. Allow yourself to once more taste the sweetness of life. When you’re ready, extinguish the candles. Release the quarters and close the circle if desired.

When you’re ready, on a sunny day, go to a river or running water. Toss the key into the water. Walk away, hold your head high, and do not look back until you’re all the way home.

Afterwards, if you still have the candles left, you may want to light them whenever you’re feeling down.

Spell written by: James Kambos
Spell from: Llewellyn’s 2014 Witches’ Spell-A-Day Almanac
Do not remove credit

Autumn Stone Healing Spell

witchcraftings:

Purpose: In autumn and winter, it’s difficult to work with fresh herbs and flowers. Using stones and roots may be easier. This stone is to be used to heal during the harvest season. It can be “recharged” as often as needed.

Materials: 1 smooth, white stone; 1 light blue candle.

Before you do the spell: The original author of the spell says one must go out and find the stone themselves. If you don’t find a stone, I personally don’t believe you’re meant to do the spell. But it’s up to you! You can go out and buy a stone if you wish, but the healing powers are meant to be drawn from the earth, and so buying one out be counter-productive.

This spell should be done…: At the beginning of autumn, before the harvest begins. On a full moon. On a Sunday. As with all spells, these are just suggestions and not requirements.

Instructions:

Wash the stone in cold water. Pat dry.

Cast circle and call quarters if desired.

Sit in a comfortable area. Light a pale blue candle (make sure it won’t topple over while you meditate). Hold the stone. Ground and centre. Go into a meditation. Completely relax your body and mind. Visualize a pale blue light streaming through your Third Eye, all through your body, and into the stone.

When you feel the stone is energized enough (I usually feel the stone get heavier or “fuller”), chant the following as many times as you see fit:

"Forged in earth, smooth white stone
Filled with power to heal and mend.
Ancient magic to flesh and bone
Healing force you now lend.”

Extinguish candle, or let the candle burn out. Ground and centre if needed. Release quarters and close circle if desired. Carry the stone with you.

Spell written by: Michael Furie
Spell from: Llewellyn’s 2014 Witches’ Spell-A-Day Almanac
Do not remove credit.

Spell to Start a New Habit

witchcraftings:

Purpose: To start a new and positive habit (like getting up early or exercising).

Materials: A piece of agate or jasper; sunlight or candlelight; cold water or sage incense; a deeply-rooted tree.

This spell should be done…: During the waxing moon.

Instructions:

Cleanse the crystal of choice either in cold water or sage incense. Let it sit in the sunlight or candlelight for a few hours.

Cast a circle and call the quarters if desired. Ground and centre if needed.

With both hands, hold the crystal against your lower belly. Close your eyes and visualize yourself partaking in this habit. Feel the sense of accomplishment that comes with sticking with the action regularly. See, imagine, and feel all the benefits of it. See yourself adopting this habit with ease.

Next, say the following:

"I commit. I follow through. I succeed.
As I will it, so it must be.”

Release the quarters and close the circle if desired.

Go outside and bury the crystal at the foot of a deeply-rooted tree.

Spell written by: Tess Whitehurst
Spell found in: Llewellyn’s 2014 Witches’ Spell-A-Day Almanac
Do not remove credit

Drown in It: A Witches of East End Curse

the-weatherwitch:

image

This curse is to make its target feel the repercussions of their actions, to become submerged and weighed down by them. You’ll need:

  • A Poppet
  • A Jar
  • Yarn
  • A Weight (pebble etc) 
  • Water (id use storm water) 
  • Pen & paper
  • Something to like the poppet to your target (optional)

Firstly make your poppet, make sure its not going to absorb water, id say make it like the one pictured. Name it your target.

"I name this poppet [target name] all I do until it, I do unto you."

Get your jar and fill it with water, charge it with your anger.
Once this is done write down all the reasons your cursing your target/what they should drown in - the painful feelings they caused you.

This could be precise like “feel the pain you caused me” or key words like “guilt”. Toss them into the jar male sure they sink or at least submerged underwater.

Tie your yarn to a weight or pebble and tie it to your poppet. You can say whatever else you wish at this point such as “this pebble ways you down, in your actions shall you drown”

But you could just simple say.
“[target name] drown in it”

Then put the poppet in the jar.
As long as it stays submerged it will be affected by this curse and your target will feel the weight of their actions.

You Can’t Take the Sky from Me - A Spell to Keep Flying (Firefly)

fyeahpopculturewitchcraft:

This spell is for when you’re in a tough spot, when the world is trying to bring you down, when you just need to keep flying.

You will need:

  • A leaf
  • Three stones
  • A permanent marker
  • A windy day
  • A brown coat. This is just to wear during the spell as ceremonial dress of sorts; it can be a parka, a blazer, plaid, striped, whatever; it can be second-hand or borrowed or anything. As long as it’s a coat and it’s brown, you’ll be shiny. If you don’t have and can’t get a brown coat, a brown shirt will work, or any item of apparel that you feel connects you to Firefly or its characters.

Procedure:

The three stones represent the troubles in your life. If you wish, you can take the permanent marker and write specific worries, problems, or things you’ve lost on each stone, or you can just meditate on your troubles while holding the stones.

The leaf represents you, and your ability to persevere even through these troubles. Take the marker and write on the leaf “I will keep flying." Write it as many times as you’d like, and feel free to add other Firefly quotes that appeal to you, or even quotes from other sources.

Put on your brown coat, and go outside. This works best when you have a good space to throw the stones without being able to see where they land, or a pond or body of water to sink them in. If you have to do this out a window, you can, but be careful.

Taking the stones in hand, say or sing: Take my love.

and throw one of the stones. If you’re doing this out a window, just drop it carefully - causing property damage is not the idea here. However, if you do just drop the stones, don’t look for them ever again. Don’t pick them up. Don’t look down when you’re walking in the area where you dropped them. If you happen to accidentally glimpse one, pretend you didn’t. For the purposes of this spell, those stones are gone the instant you let go of them after speaking the words. 

Continue the first verse of the song, throwing the second rock after you say Take my land, and the third after you say Take me where I cannot stand.

Now hold up the leaf, and say to yourself 

I don’t care, I’m still free.

As you say these words, imagine yourself leaving behind the troubles that you cast away with those stones. If it isn’t a very windy day, tear up the leaf as you speak, which will let the scraps fly away more easily.
When you say
You can’t take the sky from me,
cast the leaf into the wind, and watch how it soars. 

If you’d like, you can repeat this process using more stones, more leaves, and other verses of the Ballad of Serenity.

Blood Magic

natural-magics:

pomegranateandivy:

I know this is a touchy subject, and I’m really hoping that nobody get’s offended by this topic, but blood magic is a valid branch of magic that I practice and it has come to my attention that it’s really hard to find any good sources on blood magic. Keep in mind, I don’t claim to be any kind of authority, and this is all my personal practice. I’m more than willing to hear how others use blood magic, but please, NO SHAMING. If you don’t like blood magic, you’re free to state why, but avoid blanketed statements such as “it’s evil/wrong/sick/ect…” because, just because it’s not okay for you, doesn’t mean your morals and life experiences apply to everyone else.  

Overview

First and foremost, in my experience and learnings, blood magic is not evil. It is powerful. Big difference. Blood has a lot of connotations and associations tied to it, so it packs a bit of a metaphysical punch when you add it to a spell. What you do with that punch is all on you.

Physically, it is you. Or who ever the blood is from. This means a couple things. One, it is a stand in, and possibly the strongest representation of a person in spell work. Now, because it IS a part of your body, your blood only represents you, possibly family with blood ties, your blood can’t be used to represent another person. Also, using your blood in a spell will permanently tie the spell to you. As far as I’ve noticed, it won’t ever lose it’s focus on the target who’s blood is included in the spell.

The other thing I’ve learned about blood magic, is that blood holds “a charge”, be it intent, energy, or whatever, almost indefinitely. This helps keep a spell from fading over time. This is good, and bad. If you want a spell to last essentially forever, then use blood. I’ve come across spellwork from my grandparents that had blood, and it STILL had a very strong and clear intent attached to it. This also means that you have to actively dispel the intent and break the spell if you ever change your mind or decide you’re done with it. How you break the spell varies, depending on the spell itself and your practice, but it’s got to be a good, strong, solid break to the spell.

Read More

Storm Sorceress’ Resources: Rain Water

stormsorceress:

Rain water indicates water fallen without thunder or lightning.

I’m going to separate rain into three categories, based upon the strength at which it falls, in order to explain my personal associations.

1. A Light Mist:

  • A brief cooling down. (ex. Resting your energy on a project.)
  • Encouraging blossoming. (ex. Promoting new talents.)
  • To make wet, or lubricate. (ex. To get projects moving along.)

2. Medium:

  • Cleansing. (ex. Cleaning a room after sickness.)
  • Washing away obstacles. (ex. Push aside the challenges that discourage your creativity.)
  • Promoting growth. (ex. Learning a lesson.)

3. Downpour

  • Banishing negativity. (ex. Ridding negative habits and people from your life.)
  • Erasing. (ex. Ridding memories.)
  • Flooding. (ex. Overwhelming feelings, or strong increase in inspirations.)

You don’t have to limit yourself to collecting the water in a jar, and waiting for another day to use it. Keep it as simple or as advanced as you wish. You can write down a project you’d like to move along, and allow a misty rain to wet it. Write all of your obstacles down on a chalkboard, wet a paper towel in medium rain, and wash them away. Soak pictures of memories you no longer want to keep.

Image source [x]

Nightmare Jar

witchsmoke:

Some friends of mine were having pretty aggravating nightmares, so I put together some jars to help them out.

Tools and ingredients:

  • Small clear jar or bottle (a baby food jar works well or anything you can seal)
  • Black yarn
  • Hair of person needing protection
  • Sharp objects like nails, screws, glass, and my favorite are the pod casings from buckeyes
  • Salt
  • Lavender
  • Mint
  • Rose petals (optional)

Procedure:

Start by placing hair in the vessel. This tricks whatever is coming after the person into being drawn to the jar. I suppose you could also use a portrait, fingernails, or any other “decoy” you wish. (My friend made one for a friend once using her own hair instead of the person having nightmares and received good results from that as well.)

Put in your sharp pointies now. They are going to poke and prod at the negativity and trap it in the jar once they’ve been drawn in, caging it in.

Next, put in your herbs. Mint and Lavender are meant to help the afflicted gain restful and calm sleep, plus mint has cleansing properties.I added rose petals for love.

Add about half of your salt.

The black yarn is meant to absorb the negative energy that is drawn in by the hair/nails/picture/etc. Wrap it up into a tiny little ball and drop it into the jar, imagining the darkness getting sucked into the yarn.

Pour the remaining salt into the vessel and seal it up. Feel free to include any relevant sigils or runes you wish on the outside of the bottle, and/or ask for a deity’s blessing.

Upkeep:

Keep the nightmare jar near the bed. A windowsill is best, as you will need to recharge the bottle in sunlight every so often. So if you can find a place where it can charge and clean in the sun by day and be there for you at night, that would be ideal.